• Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

    Glasgow Polytechnic

    Chess Club

    1919 - 2019

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Detailed Blog Information

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Detailed Blog Information

Man vs Machine Update

Nakamura vs Komodo - the result

Nakamura vs Komodo

The contest was in two parts. Hikaru played all 20 levels of Komodo. Hikaru played white in all these games. The time control was five minutes with a five second increment. Hikaru won a brilliant 19 out of 20 of the games. He beat Komodo at all levels, except level 20. 

Hikaru Nakamura then played three games against the new engine - Komodo Monte Carlo. The new engine was rated at 2960, whilst Hikaru was rated at 2787. To compensate, in the first game, Komodo's f7 pawn was removed, and Hikaru - white - was also given an extra pawn. The second game, one of Hikaru's pawns was replaced with an extra Knight. The third game - called Nightmare - had all of Komodo's back rank pieces transformed into Knights. Hikaru had his two Knights removed. Very strange.

Nakamura drew all the three games. Komodo Monte Carlo was a strong opponent. But not quite human. This was clear during the endgame of the second game, where Hikaru and Komodo were left with only their King and a single Knight each. Komodo again and  again refused accept Hikaru's Knight. It did not immediately understand that the position was a draw. It was good to know that Komodo Monte Carlo was not yet perfect.


© 2018-19 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

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Man vs Machine Update

Nakamura vs Komodo - the result

Nakamura vs Komodo

The contest was in two parts. Hikaru played all 20 levels of Komodo. Hikaru played white in all these games. The time control was five minutes with a five second increment. Hikaru won a brilliant 19 out of 20 of the games. He beat Komodo at all levels, except level 20. 

Hikaru Nakamura then played three games against the new engine - Komodo Monte Carlo. The new engine was rated at 2960, whilst Hikaru was rated at 2787. To compensate, in the first game, Komodo's f7 pawn was removed, and Hikaru - white - was also given an extra pawn. The second game, one of Hikaru's pawns was replaced with an extra Knight. The third game - called Nightmare - had all of Komodo's back rank pieces transformed into Knights. Hikaru had his two Knights removed. Very strange.

Nakamura drew all the three games. Komodo Monte Carlo was a strong opponent. But not quite human. This was clear during the endgame of the second game, where Hikaru and Komodo were left with only their King and a single Knight each. Komodo again and  again refused accept Hikaru's Knight. It did not immediately understand that the position was a draw. It was good to know that Komodo Monte Carlo was not yet perfect.


© 2018-19 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

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Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

Man vs Machine Update

Nakamura vs Komodo - the result

Nakamura vs Komodo

The contest was in two parts. Hikaru played all 20 levels of Komodo. Hikaru played white in all these games. The time control was five minutes with a five second increment. Hikaru won a brilliant 19 out of 20 of the games. He beat Komodo at all levels, except level 20. 

Hikaru Nakamura then played three games against the new engine - Komodo Monte Carlo. The new engine was rated at 2960, whilst Hikaru was rated at 2787. To compensate, in the first game, Komodo's f7 pawn was removed, and Hikaru - white - was also given an extra pawn. The second game, one of Hikaru's pawns was replaced with an extra Knight. The third game - called Nightmare - had all of Komodo's back rank pieces transformed into Knights. Hikaru had his two Knights removed. Very strange.

Nakamura drew all the three games. Komodo Monte Carlo was a strong opponent. But not quite human. This was clear during the endgame of the second game, where Hikaru and Komodo were left with only their King and a single Knight each. Komodo again and  again refused accept Hikaru's Knight. It did not immediately understand that the position was a draw. It was good to know that Komodo Monte Carlo was not yet perfect.


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© 2018-19 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

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