• Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

    Glasgow Polytechnic

    Chess Club

    1919 - 2020

Logo
Logo

Detailed Blog Information

Logo
Logo

Detailed Blog Information

Alternate Title

Alizade and Takahashi win Christmas Lightning Tournament

Christmas Lightning

            The Centenary Celebrations seemed a fitting excuse to amalgamate two passions (bridge and chess) with a pairs lightning tournament at the Poly. Eight willing souls turned up and were paired off gradings-wise, first&eighth, second& seventh etc. The four “teams” were given a rudimentary introductory talk on “lightning chess” – you play a move when the bell rings (actually it was a gong, but does a gong…gong?) every ten seconds (actually, since they were new to this, I generously extended this up to…eleven seconds). To add to the wtf score, each team member played alternate moves, with no discussion allowed.

            Tight adjudications were required over failure-to-move-on-the-buzzer and illegal moves. My natural tendency towards leniency led to my devising a form of three-step defaults for the former, and two-step defaults for the latter. This did rather backfire, creating more than one result of “0.5-0”. But it’s all a bit of fun, Dougal.

            Four teams meant a nice double all-play-all. Gibb and Marshall got off to a flier, losing their first three matches. Back-rank mates featured highly, as did losing Queens, though I could hear Dairena’s teeth churning when she forced a lovely forking of Queen and King only for Austin to retreat the knight to a place of safety. Meanwhile Ciadh was taking full advantage of an early stroke of luck (Kaveh Alizade turned up, and took my place) to race to 2/2, before falling to the above in Round 3. Eric Martin and Liam Power got the obligatory point against Robert and Alex, leaving three teams joint top on 2/3.

            The break for panettoni (A Marshall), rock buns (R Gibb) and tea/coffee (Gaffney) rejuvenated the slow-starters for the second half, but with one round to play, they could not win (1.0), leaving Alizade/Takahashi (3), Martin/Power (2.5) and Connor/Gaffney (2.5) to slog it out. As often the case, the back-markers ran away with their “dead rubber” against Connor/Gaffney. In the decider, Eric continued to make good moves – many when it was not his turn – but he and Liam eventually succumbed to Kaveh and Ciadh who ran out winners with 4 points.

            Final standings:

Alizade & Takahashi              4.0

Connor & Gaffney                  2.5

Martin & Power                      2.5

Gibb & Marshall                     2.0

            During the various breaks, competitors tried to solve five chess puzzles of varying difficulty, including the “mate-in-two for White plus retrograde proof” shown below. Black had never promoted a pawn, and had just captured on b6. The actual proof was not required – only the perception of what it was you had to prove. After all, it entailed a five-stage+ retro-analysis procedure. Despite this, Austin kept coming up to me during the tournament. First two stages cracked. Then the third. Then on the discussion at the end, the fourth followed. I had to call a halt. Can’t let these whippersnappers get their own way. He’s probably sent in the last step by now, so I’m not checking emails. Only previous person to solve this was Ken Stewart.

            I hope a good night was had by all.

© 2018-20 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

Poly Chess Club Facebook

Sitemap

Alternate Title

Alizade and Takahashi win Christmas Lightning Tournament

Christmas Lightning

            The Centenary Celebrations seemed a fitting excuse to amalgamate two passions (bridge and chess) with a pairs lightning tournament at the Poly. Eight willing souls turned up and were paired off gradings-wise, first&eighth, second& seventh etc. The four “teams” were given a rudimentary introductory talk on “lightning chess” – you play a move when the bell rings (actually it was a gong, but does a gong…gong?) every ten seconds (actually, since they were new to this, I generously extended this up to…eleven seconds). To add to the wtf score, each team member played alternate moves, with no discussion allowed.

            Tight adjudications were required over failure-to-move-on-the-buzzer and illegal moves. My natural tendency towards leniency led to my devising a form of three-step defaults for the former, and two-step defaults for the latter. This did rather backfire, creating more than one result of “0.5-0”. But it’s all a bit of fun, Dougal.

            Four teams meant a nice double all-play-all. Gibb and Marshall got off to a flier, losing their first three matches. Back-rank mates featured highly, as did losing Queens, though I could hear Dairena’s teeth churning when she forced a lovely forking of Queen and King only for Austin to retreat the knight to a place of safety. Meanwhile Ciadh was taking full advantage of an early stroke of luck (Kaveh Alizade turned up, and took my place) to race to 2/2, before falling to the above in Round 3. Eric Martin and Liam Power got the obligatory point against Robert and Alex, leaving three teams joint top on 2/3.

            The break for panettoni (A Marshall), rock buns (R Gibb) and tea/coffee (Gaffney) rejuvenated the slow-starters for the second half, but with one round to play, they could not win (1.0), leaving Alizade/Takahashi (3), Martin/Power (2.5) and Connor/Gaffney (2.5) to slog it out. As often the case, the back-markers ran away with their “dead rubber” against Connor/Gaffney. In the decider, Eric continued to make good moves – many when it was not his turn – but he and Liam eventually succumbed to Kaveh and Ciadh who ran out winners with 4 points.

            Final standings:

Alizade & Takahashi              4.0

Connor & Gaffney                  2.5

Martin & Power                      2.5

Gibb & Marshall                     2.0

            During the various breaks, competitors tried to solve five chess puzzles of varying difficulty, including the “mate-in-two for White plus retrograde proof” shown below. Black had never promoted a pawn, and had just captured on b6. The actual proof was not required – only the perception of what it was you had to prove. After all, it entailed a five-stage+ retro-analysis procedure. Despite this, Austin kept coming up to me during the tournament. First two stages cracked. Then the third. Then on the discussion at the end, the fourth followed. I had to call a halt. Can’t let these whippersnappers get their own way. He’s probably sent in the last step by now, so I’m not checking emails. Only previous person to solve this was Ken Stewart.

            I hope a good night was had by all.

© 2018-20 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

Poly Chess Club Facebook

Sitemap

Please rotate your device

This page is best viewed in Portrait orientation
Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

Alternate Title

Alizade and Takahashi win Christmas Lightning Tournament

Christmas Lightning

            The Centenary Celebrations seemed a fitting excuse to amalgamate two passions (bridge and chess) with a pairs lightning tournament at the Poly. Eight willing souls turned up and were paired off gradings-wise, first&eighth, second& seventh etc. The four “teams” were given a rudimentary introductory talk on “lightning chess” – you play a move when the bell rings (actually it was a gong, but does a gong…gong?) every ten seconds (actually, since they were new to this, I generously extended this up to…eleven seconds). To add to the wtf score, each team member played alternate moves, with no discussion allowed.

            Tight adjudications were required over failure-to-move-on-the-buzzer and illegal moves. My natural tendency towards leniency led to my devising a form of three-step defaults for the former, and two-step defaults for the latter. This did rather backfire, creating more than one result of “0.5-0”. But it’s all a bit of fun, Dougal.

            Four teams meant a nice double all-play-all. Gibb and Marshall got off to a flier, losing their first three matches. Back-rank mates featured highly, as did losing Queens, though I could hear Dairena’s teeth churning when she forced a lovely forking of Queen and King only for Austin to retreat the knight to a place of safety. Meanwhile Ciadh was taking full advantage of an early stroke of luck (Kaveh Alizade turned up, and took my place) to race to 2/2, before falling to the above in Round 3. Eric Martin and Liam Power got the obligatory point against Robert and Alex, leaving three teams joint top on 2/3.

            The break for panettoni (A Marshall), rock buns (R Gibb) and tea/coffee (Gaffney) rejuvenated the slow-starters for the second half, but with one round to play, they could not win (1.0), leaving Alizade/Takahashi (3), Martin/Power (2.5) and Connor/Gaffney (2.5) to slog it out. As often the case, the back-markers ran away with their “dead rubber” against Connor/Gaffney. In the decider, Eric continued to make good moves – many when it was not his turn – but he and Liam eventually succumbed to Kaveh and Ciadh who ran out winners with 4 points.

            Final standings:

Alizade & Takahashi              4.0

Connor & Gaffney                  2.5

Martin & Power                      2.5

Gibb & Marshall                     2.0

            During the various breaks, competitors tried to solve five chess puzzles of varying difficulty, including the “mate-in-two for White plus retrograde proof” shown below. Black had never promoted a pawn, and had just captured on b6. The actual proof was not required – only the perception of what it was you had to prove. After all, it entailed a five-stage+ retro-analysis procedure. Despite this, Austin kept coming up to me during the tournament. First two stages cracked. Then the third. Then on the discussion at the end, the fourth followed. I had to call a halt. Can’t let these whippersnappers get their own way. He’s probably sent in the last step by now, so I’m not checking emails. Only previous person to solve this was Ken Stewart.

            I hope a good night was had by all.

Poly Chess Club Facebook

Sitemap

© 2018-20 Glasgow Polytechnic Chess Club

We use cookies to monitor and improve the website. No personal data is collected, except for the purpose of responding to your enquiry.